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Devices for Developing Nations: Examples of Low Cost High Impact Projects from Pediatric and Adult Medicine
Wednesday, April 9, 2:00-3:30, Ski-U-Mah, McNamara Alumni Center

Organizer: Gwenyth Fischer, MD, University of Minnesota Pediatric Critical Care

"Respiratory Support with Bubble CPAP in Children in Low Resource Areas"
Ashley Bjorkland, Pediatric Critical Care Fellow, University of Minnesota, Amplatz Children's Hospital

"Pocket Protocols: Advancing Mobile Technologies for Newborn Health"
Annamarie Saarinen, Chairman, Newborn Foundation | Coalition

"Health Stethoscope Screening for Heart Disease"
Lee Pyles, Associate Professor, Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, University of Minnesota
Pouya Hemmati, Third Year Medical Student, University of Minnesota


Session Abstract:

Designing and building medical devices for developing nations requires a different thought process than traditional device development. Cost, mobility, access to materials and other constraints play a large role in success. This session will explore several examples of high impact medical devices in both Pediatric and Adult care currently being developed.


Session Organizer Bio:

Gwenyth Fischer, MD, Pediatric Critical Care, University of Minnesota
Dr. Fischer is a pediatric intensive care physician and Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota. She is an alumnus of the Medical Device Center Innovation Fellowship, and founded the Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium as an industry-academic collaboration to facilitate development of pediatric medical device technology. She is also a practicing critical care physician at Amplatz Children’s Hospital.


Speaker Bios:

Ashley Bjorkland, Pediatric Critical Care Fellow, University of Minnesota, Amplatz Children's Hospital
Ashley Bjorklund is a first year Pediatric Critical Care Fellow at the University of Minnesota and a Lieutenant Commander in Medical Corps of the United States Navy. She has spent time doing medical work in Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Kenya. Her research is focused on advancement of respiratory support devices for low resource areas.

Annamarie Saarinen, Chairman, Newborn Foundation | Coalition
Annamarie Saarinen is a Humphrey Policy Fellow and co-founder of the Newborn Foundation | Coalition and its Innovation Incubator. She advises multiple states, federal agencies and international governments on leveraging health technologies to improve early detection, outcomes and access. Annamarie holds a degree in Economics, did her masters work in Health Economics and is recognized for spearheading the addition of congenital heart defects to the US universal newborn screening panel.

Lee Pyles, Associate Professor, Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, University of Minnesota
Lee Pyles, MD, MS is a Pediatric Cardiologist and Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine at the University of Minnesota. He has earned a Masters of Science in Health Informatics and become a diplomate of the American Board of Preventive Medicine SubBoard in Clinical Informatics in 2013. He is the physician champion for meaningful use of electronic health records and for Epic MyChart for UM Health. Dr. Pyles is a member of the Program Services Advisory Committee for Children’s HeartLink of Minneapolis, MN.

Pouya Hemmati, Third Year Medical Student, University of Minnesota
Pouya Hemmati is a third year medical student with a BS in Neuroscience from the Honors College of Biological Sciences from the University of Minnesota. He has an interest in Cardiovascular Health Informatics and he completed a survey of mHealth readiness in Kunming, China, as part of a Children’s HeartLink training mission. He also has developed and presented research on the digital stethoscope at the 6th World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery.


Presentation Abstracts:

"Respiratory Support with Bubble CPAP in Children in Low Resource Areas"
Pneumonia causes over 1 million pediatric deaths a year in developing countries. In these areas, ventilator support for children with respiratory distress is not usually a feasible option. There are multiple barriers to mechanical ventilation, thus there is an immense need for development of simple, inexpensive respiratory support devices. Design of a modified bubble CPAP device, which does not require electricity or intensive monitoring/personnel, may be a viable alternative for use in low resource countries.

"Pocket Protocols: Advancing Mobile Technologies for Newborn Health"
Newborn pulse oximetry screening has emerged as an effective way to support early detection of asymptomatic newborns with most forms of congenital heart disease and other serious health conditions, including newborn infection, sepsis, respiratory illness, and PPHN. CHD is the most common and deadly birth defect, while sepsis and pneumonia are among the top three killers of newborns, claiming more than 25% of the 4M newborn lives lost annually. The collaborative development of the first scalable, hospital-grade, pulse oximeter for mobile devices is playing a key role in a new global initiative to reduce neonatal mortality by screening newborns in low-resource health settings, and leading to other holistic POC screening and diagnostic tools.

"mHealth Stethoscope Screening for Heart Disease"
Clinical auscultation remains essential for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the developing world. A digital stethoscope has been developed that will link to an iPhone to allow collection, transmission and remote review of heart exams obtained by rural physicians in low and middle income countries. We have obtained heart recordings and surveyed physicians for readiness to embrace technology in different areas of China. We correctly diagnosed 15 of 19 murmurs in our initial iAsuc proof of concept testing to detect congenital heart disease in underserved areas.


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