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Skin: The Weak Link in Complex Musculoskeletal Procedures

Tuesday, April 10, 4:00-5:30
Meridian Ballroom 1, Graduate Minneapolis

Organizers: Joan Bechtold, Professor, Orthopedic Surgery, University of Minnesota
Conrado Aparicio, Associate Professor, Restorative Sciences, University of Minnesota

"An in Vitro, Hydrogel-based Model to Assess the Mechanical Integrity of the Dermoepidermal Junction"
Wei-Han Lin, Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota

"Cellular and Genome Engineering of the Skin"
Mark Osborn, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota

"Measurement of Epithelial Adhesion to Transmucosal Devices/Dental Implants"
Faleh Tamimi Marino, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University

"Perioperative Wound Healing"
Amy Anne Lassig, Assistant Professor, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Minnesota; Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation


Session Abstract:

Skin health is key to musculoskeletal healing and integration of devices, particularly for open fractures and for areas of the body where skin healing is tenuous (ankle, tibia) or skin is compromised (smokers, head/neck tumors). This session will examine clinical and mechanical assessments for new treatments to improve skin healing, applications of Stem Cells in skin healing, and molecular candidates to improve transdermal attachment and sealing for long term durability and infection prevention.


Session Organizer Bios:

Joan Bechtold, Professor, Orthopedic Surgery, University of Minnesota
Joan Bechtold is a Professor in the Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and in the Graduate Programs in Biomedical Engineering and in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Bechtold has been the Director of the Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis since 1984, where she works very closely with an active group of Orthopaedic Surgeons. She has been continuously funded by NIH to study the failure mechanisms of revision joint replacement since 1996.

Conrado Aparicio, Associate Professor, Restorative Sciences, University of Minnesota
Conrado Aparicio is an Associate Professor in the Department of Restorative Sciences and in the Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Aparicio is Deputy Director of the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics since 2010, where he has a Federal funded research program on using biomolecules for dental surfaces and interfaces. He also collaborates with corporate partners leaders in this field.


Speaker Bios:

Wei-Han Lin, Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota
I'm a graduate student working with Dr.Ogle. My current research interests are tissue engineering and the influence of environmental signals on stem cells. I am now working to develop an in vitro model of the dermo-epidermal junction exploiting polymeric hydrogels and extracellular matrix proteins to better understand the etiology of dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa. (Wei-Han Lin is presenting on behalf of Brenda Ogle PhD, the PI of System Regeneration Lab)

Mark Osborn, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota
Dr. Osborn is an assistant professor in the department of pediatrics and a member of the stem cell institute, institute for engineering in medicine, and the center for genome engineering.

Faleh Tamimi Marino, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University
Dr.Tamimi has a Bachelor Degree in Dental Surgery (BDS) from Jordan University and holds a PhD and degrees in both Implant Prosthodontics and Geriatric Dentistry from the University Complutense of Madrid (Spain), as well as a Post-Doctoral Fellowship from McGill University (Canada).  Dr. Tamimi is a Canada Research Chair and an  Associate Professor at the Faculty of Dentistry of  McGill University. He holds administrative positions in the Special Task Force  for New Technologies of the Canadian Dental Association, the Network for Canadian Oral Health Research, and the Quebec Network for Bone and Oral Health Research. He has published more than 100 articles in peer-reviewed dental and medical journals.

Amy Anne Lassig, Assistant Professor, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Minnesota; Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation
Dr. Lassig is a fellowship-trained head and neck surgeon practicing at Hennepin County Medical Center and the University of Minnesota. Her research program is focused on perioperative wound healing with attention to the effects of smoking.


Presentation Abstracts:

"An in Vitro, Hydrogel-based Model to Assess the Mechanical Integrity of the Dermoepidermal Junction"
Recessive dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in collagen type VII gene critical for formation of the dermoepidermal junction. Neither tissues of animal models nor currently available in vitro models are amenable to quantitative assessment of mechanical adhesion between dermal and epidermal layers. Here we created a 3D in vitro DEJ model using extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins anchored to a PEG-based slab with human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts for quantification of mechanical adhesion between epidermal- and dermal-mimicking layers.  This model can be used to understand mechanisms contributing to RDEB pathology and to evaluate future therapeutics aimed at mechanical stabilization of the DEJ.

"Cellular and Genome Engineering of the Skin"
Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a severe skin disease characterized by chronic blistering, mitten deformities, and predisposition to aggressive squamous cell carcinoma. As a prototypical genetic disease it is amenable to correction by targeted gene modification. Programmable nucleases, nickases, and base editing technologies will be discussed.

"Measurement of Epithelial Adhesion to Transmucosal Devices/Dental Implants"
Percutaneous and permucosal devices such as catheters, infusion pumps, orthopedic, and dental implants are commonly used in medical treatments. However, these useful devices breach the soft tissue barrier that protects the body from the outer environment, and thus increase bacterial infections resulting in morbidity and mortality. Such associated infections can be prevented if these devices are effectively integrated with the surrounding soft tissue, and thus creating a strong seal from the surrounding environment. However, so far, there are no percutaneous/permucosal medical devices able to prevent infection by achieving strong integration at the soft tissue-device interface. This presentation gives an insight into the current status of research into soft tissue-implant interface and the challenges associated with these interfaces. Biological soft/hard tissue interfaces may provide insights toward engineering better soft tissue inter faces around percutaneous devices. And addresses recent progress of the strategies aiming to develop a strong soft tissue seal around osseointegrated implants, such as orthopedic and dental implants.

"Perioperative Wound Healing"
Maximizing surgical and traumatic wound healing is critical to optimizing clinical outcomes. In this presentation, we will discuss means of assessing and maximizing surgical wound healing.

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