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Advances in Medical Devices 2

Thursday, April 12, 10:15-11:45
Meridian Ballroom 1, Graduate Minneapolis

Organizers: Matthew Johnson, Contributed Papers Co-Chair, University of Minnesota
Carl Nelson, Contributed Papers Co-Chair, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

"Simulating Airway Collapse in Obstructive Sleep Apnea using Fluid-Structure Interaction Methodologies" (DMD2018-6818)
Trung Bao Le, Medical College of Wisconsin

"Contextual Design Theory Applied to Wearables that Facilitate Kangaroo Care by Interviewing Mothers of Hospitalized Infants" (DMD2018-6915)
Abigail Clarke-Sather, Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Minnesota Duluth

"Mechanical Performance of PLLA Stent" (DMD2018-6957)
Carl Nelson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

"Preparing for Conjoined Twins Separation through Virtual Reality" (DMD2018-6895)
Bethany Juhnke, Earl E. Bakken Medical Devices Center, University of Minnesota

"Interaction Force Modeling for Joint Misalignment Minimization toward Bio-Inspired Knee Exoskeleton Design" (DMD2018-6921)
Yanjun Li, City College of New York


Session Abstract:

Presentations were chosen from 2018 DMD Conference Call for Papers accepted paper submissions. All accepted papers will be published in the Proceedings of the Design of Medical Devices Conference in the ASME Digital Collection, and will also be published as a printed book by ASME Press. Conference registration and presentation of the paper in a conference poster session is required for publication of the paper.


Speaker Bios:

Trung Bao Le, Medical College of Wisconsin
Trung Bao Le is a Research Scientist at the Medical College of Wisconsin. His research focus on fundamental phenomena in fluid-structure interaction problems at variety of scales in biomedical engineering. His techniques involve the development for scalable numerical algorithms that can run from desktop computer to supercomputers. His current effort focuses on translating simulation technology into clinical practices.

Abigail Clarke-Sather, Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Minnesota Duluth
Abigail Clarke-Sather is an assistant professor at University of Minnesota Duluth in the Mechanical & Industrial Engineering department. Dr. Clarke-Sather holds a B.A. in Physics from Earlham College and M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Michigan Technological University. Previously, she worked at the University of Delaware in the Civil & Environmental Engineering and Fashion & Apparel Studies departments.


Presentation Abstracts:

"Simulating Airway Collapse in Obstructive Sleep Apnea using Fluid-Structure Interaction Methodologies"
Obstructive Sleep Apnoea syndrome (OSA) is a prevalent sleep-related disease among adults. In this work, we aim to develop a complete model of the upper airway and perform fluid-structure interaction between the soft palate and the airflow dynamics. Our goal is to understand the main mechanism leading to the total occlusion.

"Contextual Design Theory Applied to Wearables that Facilitate Kangaroo Care by Interviewing Mothers of Hospitalized Infants"
Hospitalized infants cannot speak or advocate for their needs; parents and hospital staff caring for infant patients together are integral to an infant's recovery. Kangaroo care (KC), defined as bare skin-to-skin contact between an infant and caregiver, improves infant motor, cognitive, and social-emotional development. Care in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) requires many resources-nursing, equipment, financial, and emotional. Interviewing mothers about KC can result in improved medical device design and infant patient outcomes.

"Interaction Force Modeling for Joint Misalignment Minimization toward Bio-Inspired Knee Exoskeleton Design" (DMD2018-6921)
This presentation introduces a computational modeling framework to study the kinematic characteristics of the mechanical interface between the knee joint and the exoskeleton. This model captures the main features of the biological knee, and the simulation results demonstrate that this framework has the ability to emulate the complex knee joint motion. Insights gained from the misalignment analysis facilitates the design and optimization process of the bio-inspired exoskeletons. We have used this model to evaluate different design solutions of exoskeleton.


Related Papers Sessions:

Advances in Cardiovascular Medical Devices
Advances in Medical Devices 1

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