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Medical Technologies for Pediatric Interventions

Tuesday, April 10, 2:00-3:30
Meridian Ballroom 1, Graduate Minneapolis

Organizer: Balakrishna Haridas, Professor, Biomedical Engineering & Executive Director, TEES Office of Commercialization, Texas A&M University

"Pediatric Medical Device Development by Pediatric Clinicians via Capstone Engineering Design Programs"
Chester Koh, Associate Professor of Urology, Pediatrics, and OB/GYN, Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine; Founder, Southwest Pediatric Device Consortium

"Epicardial Heart Assist Device Design for Pediatric HF Indications"
John Criscione, Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University

"Minimally Invasive Pediatric Surgery: Challenges and Opportunities in Children"
Brad Segura, Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, University of Minnesota

"Resources for Innovators in the Pediatric Space"
Gwen Fischer, Pediatric Critical Care, University of Minnesota


Session Abstract:

This inaugural session on pediatric interventions will feature a variety of speakers including pediatric clinicians/surgeons and biomedical engineers developing new and novel technologies for pediatric interventions. Speakers will outline the unique problems that exist in the pediatric space and describe some of the emerging approaches to address these problems. With emphasis on interventional and surgical procedures, this session will address a broad range of clinical disciplines within pediatrics and hopes to stimulate engaged discussions with the distinguished panel of speakers.


Session Organizer Bios:

Balakrishna Haridas, Professor, Biomedical Engineering & Executive Director, TEES Office of Commercialization, Texas A&M University
Dr. Haridas is a MedTech entrepreneur and academician with ~27 years of experience in development of devices for minimally invasive surgery, endovascular interventions, and tissue repair. He is the Innovation Director for the PATHS-UP NSF Engineering Research Center at Texas A&M University. He is also the Executive Director, TEES Division of Commercialization, Professor & Director, BioInnovation Program in Biomedical Engineering.


Speaker Bios:

Conrad Wall

 

Chester Koh, Pediatric Urology and Founding Director of the SW FDA Pediatric Devices Consortium, Texas Children's Hospital
Dr. Koh is a pediatric urologist at Texas Children’s Hospital and Associate Professor of Urology at Baylor College of Medicine.  Dr. Koh received his BS in Mechanical Engineering from UC Berkeley and his MD from Tufts University.  He is the founder of the Southwest Pediatric Device Consortium (PDC), as well as the co-founder of FDA-funded Southern California PDC, CTIP.

John Criscione, Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University
As a Bioengineering Professor at Texas A&M, Dr. Criscione specializes in medical device design and regulation, cardiovascular mechanics, and the non-linear field theories of mechanics. His work with CorInnova focuses on epicardial heart assist devices that act directly on the heart surface and assist with ejection and filling.


Presentation Abstracts:

"Pediatric Medical Device Development by Pediatric Clinicians via Capstone Engineering Design Programs"
There is a need for devices that accommodate the unique physiology and anatomy of pediatric patients that is increasingly receiving more attention. However, there is limited literature on the programs within academia that can support pediatric device development. Unmet pediatric device needs were identified by surgical faculty and matched with engineering design teams within the Capstone Engineering Design programs at two universities. The final prototypes were showcased at the end of the academic year and provisional patent applications were filed.

"Epicardial Heart Assist Device Design for Pediatric HF Indications"
Approximately 300-500 pediatric heart transplants (ISHLT) are performed worldwide each year, representing about 12% of the total number of heart transplants.  VADs are increasingly used as a Bridge to Recovery, Bridge to Decision, Bridge to Transplant, and as Destination Therapy. VADs for pediatric indications are particularly difficult to design and develop, and non-blood contacting assist technology is potentially more advantageous for pediatric patients. Design for pediatric use has required scaling down while simultaneously keeping the driveline resistance low.


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