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Rehabilitation Technologies 1

Wednesday, April 11, 10:30-12:00
Meridian Ballroom 4, Graduate Minneapolis

Organizers: Elizabeth Hsiao-Wecksler, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
Andrew Hansen, Minneapolis VA Health Care System

"From Biomechanics to Bionics: How Scientific Insights Unleash our Imagination and Inspire New Design Solutions for Assistive Technologies"
Karl Zelik, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University

"Wearable Arm Motion Analysis System"
Rajesh Rajamani, Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota

"Design, Validation, and Clinical Study of a Wearable Device for Spasticity and Rigidity Assessment"
Seung Yun (Leo) Song, Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Session Organizer Bios:

Andrew Hansen, Minneapolis VA Health Care System
Andrew Hansen is the Director of the Minneapolis Adaptive Design & Engineering (MADE) Program at the Minneapolis VA Health Care System. He is also an Associate Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include development of rehabilitation technologies, including prostheses, wheelchairs, and exercise equipment.

Elizabeth Hsiao-Wecksler, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
Elizabeth Hsiao-Wecksler is a Professor, Willett Faculty Scholar, and Associate Head of Undergraduate Programs in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. Her research is focused on investigating and improving movement control and function through two main areas: assistive device development and locomotion biomechanics. To address these areas, we have been involved in the development of pneumatically powered orthotic devices and multi-speed wheel systems for manual wheelchairs. She is also a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.


Speaker Bios:

PH-FMKarl Zelik, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University
Dr. Zelik co-directs the Center for Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology (CREATE) at Vanderbilt University. CREATE aims to improve health, mobility and independence for individuals with disabilities, and to enhance human capabilities beyond biological limits, by engineering, measuring, optimizing and understanding technologies that physically augment human performance. Dr. Zelik’s research team employs experimental and computational methods to study human biomechanics (the science of movement) and how biomechanical principles can translate into improvements in assistive devices (prostheses, exoskeletons, smart clothing). Dr. Zelik received his B.S. and M.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis, then his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan. Following this, Dr. Zelik was a post-doctoral researcher and Whitaker International Scholar at the Santa Lucia Foundation Rehabilitation Hospital in Rome, Italy. He joined the Mechanical Engineering faculty at Vanderbilt University in 2014, and holds secondary appointments in the departments of Biomedical Engineering and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

Rajesh Rajamani, Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota
Rajesh Rajamani is a Professor in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota.  His research interests include sensing, estimation and control for smart and autonomous systems.  He is interested in bringing technologies from his lab to the market and several inventions are being commercialized through start-up companies launched by former industry executives.

Seung Yun (Leo) Song, Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Seung Yun (Leo) Song is a master’s candidate for the Mechanical Science and Engineering graduate program in University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research focuses on wearable technology in the field of neurology to help patients and clinicians monitor and diagnose different levels of abnormal muscle tone in a clinical environment.


Presentation Abstracts:

"From Biomechanics to Bionics: How Scientific Insights Unleash our Imagination and Inspire New Design Solutions for Assistive Technologies"
Mobility is livelihood. Regardless of a person’s age, profession or interests, the ability to traverse one’s world is critical. However, over 30 million Americans live with physical disabilities or neurological impairments that jeopardize their mobility and quality of life. Meanwhile about 50 million Americans are over the age of 65, and this number is expected to double by 2060; bringing with it new challenges related to keeping members of our society mobile, active and healthy. Assistive technologies (exoskeletons, prostheses and smart clothing) have exciting potential to alleviate or overcome physical disabilities, and thus to help keep individuals mobile, but only if properly designed and integrated with the human user. Despite recent technological advances, this human-device integration challenge has proven deceptively difficult, in large part because of the remarkable complexity of human movement. Sometimes our most thoughtfully-brainstormed, carefully-engineered design solutions are nonetheless not ideal, practical or effective. And sometimes the “obvious” design solution is not the best solution. The focus of this seminar will be on how scientific insights from the field of human movement biomechanics can lead to exciting, unexpected and often non-intuitive new design solutions for assistive technologies.

"Wearable Arm Motion Analysis System" Co-Author: Yan Wang, University of Minnesota
This talk describes a wearable arm motion analysis system which includes a small wireless board with a three-axes accelerometer, a gyroscope and a magnetometer. The wireless system communicates with a neighboring laptop and can be used for home-based monitoring and therapy applications. A motion estimation system is presented that computes the direction cosine matrix, avoids problems with singularities, and can eliminate drift that normally occurs due to integration of sensor bias errors. A novel auto-calibration system that utilizes constraints between the accelerometers and the magnetometer signals is used to compensate for magnetometer bias errors. To verify performance, experimental results are presented that compare the wearable-sensor-based orientation estimates for a robotic end effector with values measured from encoders on the robot.

"Design, Validation, and Clinical Study of a Wearable Device for Spasticity and Rigidity Assessment"
Current clinical assessment of abnormal muscle behaviors such as spasticity and rigidity have not been reliable, causing misdiagnosis of underlying neurological disorders and improper treatment plans for patients. To solve this problem, we developed a clinician-friendly wearable device (Position, Velocity, Resistance Meter - PVRM) that can quantitatively and reliably assess these abnormal muscle behaviors. The hardware and software design of the PVRM, validation study, and clinical study on subjects with various levels of spasticity and rigidity will be discussed.


Related Sessions:

Rehabilitation Technologies 2

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