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Three-in-Five Competition

Wednesday, April 11, 8:00-10:00
Meridian Ballrooms 2/3, Graduate Minneapolis

Competition Chairs: Randy Schiestl, VP, R&D, Global Technology, Boston Scientific Corporation
Paul Rothweiler, Earl E. Bakken Medical Devices Center, University of Minnesota


Session Abstract:

Authors of the top ten contributed papers that describe medical devices with commercial potential give a five minute presentation composed of no more than three slides. After presenters complete their pitches they answer questions from a panel of leading medical technology innovators. The Judge's Panel will base their decision upon four factors:

1) Quality of clinical need statement(problem)
2) Technical soundness of research(solution)
3) Presentation Quality
4) Fundability

The top three presenters will be awarded $500 and will be announced at the Keynote Luncheon on Thursday. We encourage each winning presentation to expand their paper for expedited review and publication in the ASME Journal of Medical Devices.


Full List of Presenters:

"No-Power-Required, Touch-Activated Compression Garments for the Treatment of POTS" (DMD2018-6886)
Rachael Granberry, NASA Space Technology Research Fellow, University of Minnesota

3RD PLACE: "Gait Rehab Adaptive Machine: Design of GRAM, A Walking Linkage Powered Wheelchair for Lower Body Therapy and Assistance" (DMD2018-6816)
Yasemin Sarigul-Klijn, Robotics, University of California, Irvine

"Solid-Lattice Hip Prosthesis Design: Applying Topology and Lattice Optimization to Reduce Stress Shielding from Hip Implants" (DMD2018-6804)
Yuhao He, Senior Project Engineer, Altair Engineering

"Design and Development of a Novel Drug Delivery Catheter for Atherosclerosis" (DMD2018-6869)
Sunandita Sarker, Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

"A High Efficiency Tunable Resonance Pump for Biomedical Applications" (DMD2018-6917)
Thomas Secord, Mechanical Engineering, University of St. Thomas

2ND PLACE: "A Novel Genioglossal Strengthening Device for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment" (DMD2018-6809)
Erik Zavrel, Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University

"Design of a Stitched Textile-Based Wearable Thermal Actuator Garment to Attenuate Peripheral Microclimate Experience" (DMD2018-6965)
Nika Gagliardi, Department of Design, Housing, and Apparel, University of Minnesota

"Isometric Quadriceps Strength Test Device to Improve the Reliability of Handheld Dynamometry in Patient with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury" (DMD2018-6848)
Reggie St. Louis, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University

GRAND PRIZE: "A Novel Lead Garment Structural System to Alleviate Orthopedic Stress for Surgeons" (DMD2018-6920)
Hilary Johnson and Sally Miller, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"Wearable Olfactory Augmentation Device for Hazardous Gas Detection" (DMD2018-6953)
Joshua Lee, Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology


Speaker Bios:

Rachael Granberry, NASA Space Technology Research Fellow, University of Minnesota
Rachael is a NASA Space Technology Research Fellow and Master of Science Apparel Studies candidate at the University of Minnesota where she is researching and designing active knit materials for aerospace compression garment applications. Previously, she was a Research Fellow at the Wyss Institute at Harvard University where she assisted in the development of textile-based robotic and passive-assist exosuits.

Yasemin Sarigul-Klijn, Robotics, University of California, Irvine
Yasemin just completed her Ph.D. in Robotics from the University of California, Irvine. She is currently seeking new opportunities in industry and academia.

Yuhao He, Senior Project Engineer, Altair Engineering
Yuhao has 6 years of experience to perform structural analysis and optimization for various types of industries, including automotive, aerospace, and medical device industry. Yuhao has both Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He also holds a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Shanghai Jiaotong University.

Sunandita Sarker, Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Sunandita is a second-year Ph.D. student in Mechanical and Materials Engineering department at University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She got her bachelor’s degree from Bangladesh University of Engineering and technology (BUET) on 2015. Currently she is a graduate research assistant at the Terry Research laboratory, working on novel drug delivery systems and swallowable capsule robot.

Thomas Secord, Mechanical Engineering, University of St. Thomas
Dr. Secord is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of St. Thomas. Prior to St. Thomas, he spent six years at Medtronic working on the design and testing of transcatheter heart valves. Dr. Secord completed his Ph.D. at MIT in 2010. His current research focuses on the design of novel sensor and actuator systems for cardiac applications.

Erik Zavrel, Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University
Erik Zavrel is a PhD candidate in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University. His research focuses on the development of novel non-pharmacological device-based interventions for sleep disorders. He conducts clinical trials at Weill Cornell's Center for Sleep Medicine in New York City.

Nika Gagliardi, Department of Design, Housing, and Apparel, University of Minnesota
Nika is a master’s student in the Apparel Studies track at the University of Minnesota. Her graduate work is focused on wearable technologies, and she is currently a research assistant in the University of Minnesota's Wearable Technology Lab.

Reggie St. Louis, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University
Reggie is an undergraduate student in bioengineering at Harvard University. He is interested in the development of low-cost devices that enable the use of quantifiable metrics in musculoskeletal injury rehabilitation.

Hilary Johnson, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Hilary Johnson is passionate about working at the nexus of human centered problem solving and deterministic machine design. She is currently a PhD student in mechanical engineering at MIT in the Precision Engineering Research Group advised by Professor Alex Slocum.

Joshua Lee, Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
Joshua Lee is a PhD candidate in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. His research is in developing upper-limmb prosthetic device suitable for haptic feedback and EMG control.


Presentation Abstracts:

"No-Power-Required, Touch-Activated Compression Garments for the Treatment of POTS" (DMD2018-6886)
Lower body compression is a core component to the treatment of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Compression garments currently on the market present donning/doffing challenges as well as comfort and aesthetic concerns, qualities which result in noncompliance. We propose a compression garment designed with integrated shape memory alloy springs engineered to actuate upon contact with the body. This simple design solution, disguised in a pair of athletic leggings, enables our prototype to transition from loose to tight without a power source.

"Gait Rehab Adaptive Machine: Design of GRAM, A Walking Linkage Powered Wheelchair for Lower Body Therapy and Assistance" (DMD2018-6816)
Therapy options for those with walking disability are limited by cost and complexity. GRAM is a low-cost wheelchair attachment that couples walking therapy to wheelchair propulsion, helping patients get around and get better.

"Solid-Lattice Hip Prosthesis Design: Applying Topology and Lattice Optimization to Reduce Stress Shielding from Hip Implants" (DMD2018-6804)
This presentation introduces a design methodology for a prosthesis which causes less stress shielding. Stress shielding is the reduction in bone stresses due to the introduction of an implant. Implants may become loose when stress shielding is present because bone resorption occurs as the bone adapts to the reduced bone stresses. Topology and lattice optimization were performed using OptiStruct to design a hip prosthesis stem where stress shielding and prosthesis fatigue were considered.

"Design and Development of a Novel Drug Delivery Catheter for Atherosclerosis" (DMD2018-6869)
Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive cardiovascular disease that results from plaque formation in the major arteries. Identified as an inflammatory disease, it is open to novel anti-inflammatory treatments including local delivery of nano drug carriers. In this research we designed and developed a novel drug delivery catheter and a delivery system for the treatment of atherosclerosis. After computational modelling, we validated the concept in a bench-top test before proceeding to In-vitro experiment.

"A High Efficiency Tunable Resonance Pump for Biomedical Applications" (DMD2018-6917)
Medical devices utilize pumps in several different application domains including medicine dispensing systems, drug and fluid infusion systems, perfusion equipment, and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). In this work, we propose a novel pump design for applications where continuous flow at high efficiency is the functional goal, such as in an LVAD. The primary approach is to use discrete tuning of system mass to modulate a mechanical resonant frequency in a diaphragm pump mechanism.

"A Novel Genioglossal Strengthening Device for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment" (DMD2018-6809)
A number of clinical studies have demonstrated that strengthening the genioglossus via oral exercises, playing of a musical wind instrument, or hypoglossal nerve stimulation can result in significant reductions in the severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. We have developed embedded and PC versions of an electromechanical, biofeedback genioglossal training device that is intuitive to use and can quantitatively track changes in genioglossal strength and fatigability.

"Isometric Quadriceps Strength Test Device to Improve the Reliability of Handheld Dynamometry in Patient with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury" (DMD2018-6848)
The distal extremities are the most thermally sensitive and best correlate of thermal comfort. This is especially significant in treating vasospastic disorders such as Raynaud’s Syndrome. Delivering heat to these areas is commonly achieved through indoor heating and is more difficult to achieve with on-body systems due to comfort challenges and rigidity of traditional technologies. The hands, in particular, are likely to be exposed and difficult to cover comfortably. Therefore, comfortable methods of delivering heat to the hands are necessary.

"Isometric Quadriceps Strength Test Device to Improve the Reliability of Handheld Dynamometry in Patient with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury" (DMD2018-6848)
Quantitative measurement of isometric quadriceps strength during rehabilitation has been shown to reduce the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury. Most physical therapists currently do not employ quantitative strength measurement techniques due to the high cost of precise equipment and the lack of reproducibility associated with existing low-cost solutions. We propose a low-cost retractable table-mounted device that can quickly and accurately measure isometric quadriceps strength.

"A Novel Lead Garment Structural System to Alleviate Orthopedic Stress for Surgeons" (DMD2018-6920)
Cardiovascular, orthopedic, and interventional radiology procedures using fluoroscopy require healthcare professionals to wear heavy lead garments for radiation protection. Wearing lead for prolonged periods can lead to musculoskeletal injuries, discomfort, and fatigue. This innovative mobile lead garment frame mitigates these negative outcomes by moving the lower garment load off body to a structural frame and redistributing the upper load from the shoulders to the hips through a torso frame. The device is compact and maximizes the limited space available in operating rooms, while still giving the surgeon adequate mobility. Preliminary analysis of device effectiveness was conducted by utilizing muscle activated electromyogram EMG sensors and qualitative surgeon user feedback surveys. The device is ready for extended user testing and commercialization.

"Wearable Olfactory Augmentation Device for Hazardous Gas Detection" (DMD2018-6953)
The ability to perceive different levels of hazardous odors is critical to professions that involve daily exposure to chemically hazardous environments, like firefighters, chemical plant workers, and painters. However, humans have limitations in the perception of odors especially in mixtures. We propose a wearable olfactory augmentation device that provides intuitive and objective delivery of complex olfactory information via haptic feedback.


Panel Judges:

Sergio Aguirre, EchoPixel

Stephanie Board, Abbott

John Deedrick, Fourth Element

Paul Hindrichs, ActiveOrtho

Del Lawson, 3M

Dan Sachs, Earl E. Bakken Medical Devices Center, University of Minnesota


Related Sessions:

Emerging Medical Innovation Valuation Competition

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