Gold University of Minnesota M. Skip to main content. University of Minnesota.
Driven to Discover.
DMD

Wearable Medical Technologies 1

Tuesday, April 10, 2:00-3:30
Meridian Ballroom 2/3, Graduate Minneapolis

Organizers: Lucy Dunne, Associate Professor, Apparel Design, University of Minnesota
Lars Oddsson, Rehab Sciences & Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota & RxFunction Inc.

"Design for Seniors"
Alex Baker, Director of Innovation, The Goodman Group

"Vibrotactile Tilt Feedback Belt Beta Testing"
Conrad Wall, Harvard University (Emeritus)

"Vibrotactile Stimuli Induced Arousals during Sleep as Potential Therapy for Nightmares Associated with PTSD"
Chad Eiken, Chief Clinical Officer, NightWare

"Compression Clothing for Autism"
Molly Fuller, Service Designer / Fashion Designer, Molly Fuller Design


Session Abstract:

The two Wearable Medical Devices sessions will explore a broad range of perspectives on wearable devices for clinical, assistive, and therapeutic purposes. Speakers will address challenges of wearable sensing, actuation, data, design, and human factors of wearable products, and focus areas that include development of enabling technologies, clothing-based interventions, and deployment/evaluation of wearable devices. The second session will conclude with a panel discussion including speakers from both sessions.


Session Organizer Bios:

Lucy Dunne, Associate Professor, Apparel Design, University of Minnesota
Lucy Dunne is an Associate Professor and Program Director for Apparel Design at the University of Minnesota, where she also co-directs the Wearable Technology Lab.

Lars Oddsson, Rehab Sciences & Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota & RxFunction Inc.
Lars Oddsson is a researcher in rehabilitation sciences associated with the University of Minnesota, where he also teaches in the Medical Device Innovation program at the Technological Leadership Institute. Dr. Oddsson is co-inventor of walkasins and co-founder of RxFunction, a Minnesota-based medical device startup.


Speaker Bios:

Alex Baker, Director of Innovation, The Goodman Group
Al Baker is an innovator who has spent his career in the intersection of product design, healthcare, and entrepreneurship. After receiving a B.S. in Economics from the University of Minnesota, he started his first company, Reemo Health, with the intention of using wearable technology to help seniors safely age in place.

Conrad Wall

 

Conrad Wall, Harvard University (Emeritus)
Conrad Wall III received his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Carnegie-Mellon University. He is a Professor Emeritus of Otology and Laryngology at Harvard Medical School. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He designed and tested the first device that used body-mounted motion sensors to let subjects control their body sway using vibrotactile feedback.

Chad Eiken, Chief Clinical Officer, NightWare
Chad Eiken has more than a decade of experience in Sleep Medicine. He is a Registered Polysomnographic Technologist, and he holds a Certification in Clinical Sleep Health. He currently serves as the President-Elect of the Minnesota Sleep Society, and the Chair of the International Committee of the Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists.

Molly Fuller, Service Designer / Fashion Designer, Molly Fuller Design
Molly has a background in fashion design and human factors. She's worked as a service designer in healthcare at Mayo Clinic and currently works at Stella Health, the parent company of Blue Cross Blue Shield of MN. She also has a clothing business creating stylish compression clothing for teens with autism and sensory needs.


Presentation Abstracts:

"Design for Seniors"
Whether your building a new device from scratch, or making minor improvements to a software, designing technology for seniors requires time, empathy, and humility. In this presentation, Al will be sharing his experience designing for seniors as an entrepreneur.

"Vibrotactile Tilt Feedback Belt Beta Testing"
A preproduction vibrotactile tilt feedback belt was tested at 10 rehabilitation sites on balance deficient subjects during walking and standing exercises selected by therapists at each site. Subjects received a vibrotactile signal in the direction they tilted when that tilt exceeded a threshold. Most subjects were able decrease their RMS tilt using the feedback, but there was substantial response variability among subjects. Data from sample subjects and the possible sources of the variability will be presented

"Vibrotactile Stimuli Induced Arousals during Sleep as Potential Therapy for Nightmares Associated with PTSD"
Vibrotactile stimuli has been shown to successfully induce arousals during sleep. We are currently researching the potential benefit of vibrotactile stimulation induced arousals as therapy for veterans suffering from nightmares associated with post-traumatic stress disorder.

"Compression Clothing for Autism"
A human-centered design approach to designing better medical clothing.


Related Sessions:

Wearable Medical Technologies 2

Register Now


Stay connected with the DMD Conference through LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Icon YouTube