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Wearable Medical Technologies 2

Tuesday, April 10, 4:00-5:30
Ski-U-Mah, McNamara Alumni Center

Organizers: Lucy Dunne, Associate Professor, Apparel Design, University of Minnesota
Lars Oddsson, Rehab Sciences & Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota & RxFunction Inc.

"Soft Wearable Robots for the Community and the Home"
Conor Walsh, Harvard University

"Materials and Fabrication Strategies for Flexible Electronics"
Sarah Swisher, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota

"Learning from Patients using a Wearable Sensory Prosthesis"
Lars Oddsson, Rehab Sciences & Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota & RxFunction Inc.


Session Abstract:

The two Wearable Medical Devices sessions will explore a broad range of perspectives on wearable devices for clinical, assistive, and therapeutic purposes. Speakers will address challenges of wearable sensing, actuation, data, design, and human factors of wearable products, and focus areas that include development of enabling technologies, clothing-based interventions, and deployment/evaluation of wearable devices. The second session will conclude with a panel discussion including speakers from both sessions.


Session Organizer Bios:

Lucy Dunne, Associate Professor, Apparel Design, University of Minnesota
Lucy Dunne is an Associate Professor and Program Director for Apparel Design at the University of Minnesota, where she also co-directs the Wearable Technology Lab.

Lars Oddsson, Rehab Sciences & Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota & RxFunction Inc.
Lars Oddsson is a researcher in rehabilitation sciences associated with the University of Minnesota, where he also teaches in the Medical Device Innovation program at the Technological Leadership Institute. Dr. Oddsson is co-inventor of walkasins and co-founder of RxFunction, a Minnesota-based medical device startup.


Speaker Bios:

PH-FMConor Walsh, Harvard University
Conor Walsh is the founder of the Harvard Biodesign Lab, which brings together researchers from the engineering, industrial design, apparel, clinical and business communities to develop new disruptive robotic technologies for augmenting and restoring human performance. This research includes new approaches to the design, manufacture and control of wearable robotic devices and characterizing their performance through biomechanical and physiological studies so as to further the scientific understanding of how humans interact with such machines.

Sarah Swisher, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota
Sarah L. Swisher received her B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, then – after several years in industry – received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley. Prof. Swisher joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering faculty at the University of Minnesota in 2015.

Sarah Swisher, University of Minnesota
Professor Sarah L. Swisher received her B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Upon graduation, she spent several years as the lead electrical design engineer for a series of GPS-enabled bicycle computers at Garmin, Intl. She then received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and computer sciences from the University of California, Berkeley. Prof. Swisher joined the electrical and computer engineering faculty at the University of Minnesota in 2015. Her research sits at the intersection of semiconductor device physics, materials science, and bioengineering, and primarily aims to leverage the beneficial properties of nanomaterials and flexible electronics to address societal-scale challenges. Her research group focuses on the materials, devices, and fabrication processes that will enable innovative advancements in biological sensors and green electronics.


Presentation Abstracts:

"Soft Wearable Robots for the Community and the Home"
This talk will briefly given an overview of next generation soft wearable robots in development at Harvard that use soft materials such as textiles and elastomers to provide a more conformal, unobtrusive and compliant means to interface to the human body. Examples will be given for robots to assist with mobility for patients with limited walking capacity (e.g. patients poststroke, with Parkinson's Disease or the elderly) as well as grasping for those unable to perform activities of daily living (e.g. patients with muscular dystrophy or spinal cord injury).

"Materials and Fabrication Strategies for Flexible Electronics"
Truly flexible electronics – systems in which all of the active and passive components can bend, fold, and roll – offer many advantages over hybrid systems that consist of rigid components on flexible substrates. In particular, flexible sensors that conform to the human body are beneficial for wearable devices because they can often provide better performance in a more comfortable form factor. In this talk, I will introduce our work developing solution-processed materials for flexible electronics, and the impact of materials synthesis and device fabrication on the performance of these devices. In addition, I will share some of the ongoing work in our group developing new nanoscale materials and fabrication methods for flexible electronics, and the potential benefits for applications in wearable electronics and medical research.

"Learning from Patients using a Wearable Sensory Prosthesis"
walkasins is a Wearable Sensory Prosthesis to improve balance in patients who have balance problems due to peripheral neuropathy. This presentation will discuss what we have learned from patients using walkasins in studies both short- and long-term effects.


Related Sessions:

Wearable Medical Technologies 1

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