Gold University of Minnesota M. Skip to main content. University of Minnesota.
Driven to Discover.
DMD

Robotics 1: Neurobotics

Tuesday, April 16, 10:30-12:00
Meridian Ballroom 1, Graduate Minneapolis

Organizer: Andrew Grande, University of Minnesota
Tim Kowalewski, University of Minnesota

"Introduction to Neurobotics"
Andrew Grande, University of Minnesota

"Robotic Assessment Following Stroke"
Douglas Cook, Associate Professor, Dept. of Neurosurgery, Queen's University

"Recent Advances in Precision Cerebrovascular Imaging and Therapy with Ultrasound"
Emad Ebbini, University of Minnesota

"WristBot, A New Robotic Platform for the Neurorehabilitation of Wrist and Hand Function"
Naveen Elangovan, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Minnesota

"Robotic Neurorehabilitation: Clinical and Commercial Challenges and Opportunities"
Jürgen Konczak, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota


Session Abstract:

This session will introduce Neurobotics, an emerging field of novel neurological therapies enabled by recent advances in robotics. At present this field is fragmented across multiple disciplines spanning robotics, rehabilitation, surgical intervention, and artificial intelligence. This session will host a variety of representatives in this area and close with a moderated discussion about the future development in the field.


Session Organizer Bios:

Tim Kowalewski, University of Minnesota
Dr. Kowalewski completed his PhD in electrical engineering for “quantitative surgical skill evaluation” at the University of Washington's Biorobotics lab. This work was recognized with a best doctoral candidate award at the American College of Surgeons AEI Consortium on Surgical Robotics and Simulation and a recent NSF CAREER award. He has helped commercialize his PhD work for quantitative skill evaluation hardware (Simulab Corp., Seattle, WA) and also co-pioneered the use of crowdsourcing for high-volume assessment of surgical skills (CSATS Inc, Seattle, WA, Acquired by Johnson & Johnson). He is currently an assistant professor University of Minnesota Mechanical Engineering department where he runs the Medical Robotics and Devices Lab.


Speaker Bios:

Douglas Cook, Associate Professor, Dept. of Neurosurgery, Queen's University
DJ Cook is a cerebrovascular neurosurgeon at Queen’s Univeristy in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. He is focused on translational models of stroke for therapeutic discovery in both acute and chronic stroke.

Bernard Choi, Professor, University of California, Irvine

Emad Ebbini, University of Minnesota
Emad Ebbini received his PhD in electrocal engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in medical applications of ultrasound with special focus on image-guided interventions using dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) systems, a concept that was pioneered in his laboratory. Dr. Ebbini is a fellow of the IEEE and served as the President of the International Society for Therapeutic Ultrasound (2012 - 2015).

 

Naveen Elangovan, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Minnesota
Naveen Elangovan, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral researcher in University of Minnesota. He is a trained physical therapist from India. His research interests include translating laboratory research to clinical practice in the field of neurological rehabilitation. He is specifically interested in employing novel rehabilitation methods to improve sensorimotor function in people with stroke and movement disorders.

Jürgen Konczak, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota
Jürgen Konczak is a professor of biomechanics and movement neuroscience at the University of Minnesota and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. in Kinesiology in 1991 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his habilitation in Psychology in 1998 at the University of Düsseldorf, Germany. His research focus is motor learning and control in neurological diseases.


Presentation Abstracts:

"Robotic Assessment Following Stroke"
Robotic assessments of stroke patients will be discussed with a focus on translational paradigms for the design of clinical trials. A focus on matching outcomes using robotic assessment between preclinical large animal model studies and clinical trials will be considered. The utility of robotic assessments of motor outcomes to control variability in post-stroke outcome measures will also be discussed.

"Recent Advances in Precision Cerebrovascular Imaging and Therapy with Ultrasound"
Modern ultrasound imaging and transducer technologies have enabled a unique paradigm for image-guided interventions using dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) systems. DMUAs provide a unique paradigm with inherent registration between the imaging and therapy coordinate systems. We have recently developed a unique streamlined hardware/software architecture that allowed for real-time closed-loop application of focused ultrasound (FUS) therapy under with millisecond temporal resolution and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. In this presentation, we describe two in vivo application of closed-loop, image-guided FUS therapy in cerebrovascular applications: 1) stereotactic trasncranial FUS application for the treatment of neurological disorders, and 2) precision lesion formation near the carotid bifurcation with possible applications in the treatment of atherosclerosis and hypertension.

"WristBot, A New Robotic Platform for the Neurorehabilitation of Wrist and Hand Function"
Proprioceptive impairment is a common clinical feature in stroke and Parkinson’s disease. Conventional treatment only partially restores proprioceptive function. I here show clinical trial data on the effects of a robot-aided somatosensory training that effectively improved proprioceptive and motor function in people with Parkinson’s disease and stroke survivors. I will argue that such robot-aided neurological rehabilitation can become an integral adjunct to conventional therapy, allowing for a rapid and enhanced motor recovery.

"Robotic Neurorehabilitation: Clinical and Commercial Challenges and Opportunities"
The use robotic devices to improve the current standard of care in neurorehabilitation is an attractive vision. Analysts predict a robust growth of this market. I will summarize current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of robot-guided treatment, which is still inconclusive. In addition, I report on the insights gained from over 100 NSF I-corps customer discovery interviews on the challenges of implementing robotic technology in rehabilitation settings and will outline how these challenges can be met.


Related Sessions:

Robotics 2: Computational Surgery & Surgical Robotics

Registration Opens Jan 2020


Stay connected with the DMD Conference through LinkedIn Twitter Facebook YouTube