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Three-in-Five Competition

Tuesday, April 13, 8:00 - 9:30 am CDT (UTC -5)

 

Click Here to Return to the ProgramCompetition Chairs: Randy Schiestl, Boston Scientific Corporation
Paul Rothweiler, University of Minnesota

Session Abstract:

Authors of the top ten contributed papers that describe medical devices with commercial potential will be competing for one of three $500 cash prizes as they give a five minute presentation composed of no more than three slides. After presenters complete their pitches they answer questions from a panel of leading medical technology innovators. The Judge's Panel will base their decision based on the quality of clinical need statement (problem), the technical soundness of research (solution), presentation quality and fundability.

Winners will be announced after the Keynote Presentation Wed., April 14, 2021 around 10:45 am CDT (UTC -5)


Presentations:

Grand Prize Winner

Sun Jay Yoo, Johns Hopkins University

The Design and Use of a Minimally-Invasive, Expandable Retractor for Deep-Seated Brain LesionsSun Jay Yoo & Mark Shifman, Johns Hopkins University

The Design and Use of a Minimally-Invasive, Expandable Retractor for Deep-Seated Brain Lesions: Access to deep-seated brain lesions (e.g., tumors, aneurysms, hematomas, and other malformations) is challenging due to the potential for retraction-induced injury. Traditionally, neurosurgeons use dissection and blade retractors to push apart tissue to visualize and operate on target lesions. These blades apply focal pressure onto the brain, resulting in ischemia, edema, and parenchymal trauma, leading to complications in up to 29% of cases. Tubular retractors were introduced to distribute forces radially and have led to improved safety and clinical outcomes. However, reports indicate that tubular retractors still led to complications in up to 9.1% of cases. Other concerns include significant pressure in the direction of insertion and the displacement of anatomic landmarks leading to inaccurate stereotaxis. We present a novel, minimally-invasive brain retractor that utilizes an expandable soft balloon to further reduce retraction- induced injury and increase stereotactic accuracy with a minimal port of entry. The device consists of a balloon catheter system, a clear sheath, and integration with neuronavigation stylets. This approach can reduce the rate of iatrogenic injury and improve clinical outcomes for brain lesion operations. Furthermore, we illustrate the efficacy of this device in use compared to those of conventional tubular and blade retractors in a pig cadaver.

Tied for 2nd Place

Alexander Ambrose, Georgia Institute of Technology

A Pneumatic Compression Vest for Transthoracic Manipulation of Ventilation-Perfusion in Critical Care Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by COVID-19Alexander Ambrose, Georgia Institute of Technology

A Pneumatic Compression Vest for Transthoracic Manipulation of Ventilation-Perfusion in Critical Care Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by COVID-19: Critical Care patients who experience symptoms of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are commonly placed on mechanical ventilators to increase the oxygen being supplied to their pulmonary system. If patients’ pulmonary inflammation is severe, they can experience ventilation-perfusion mismatch (V/Q mismatch) where blood flow and gas exchange are mismatched such that oxygen uptake is greatly impaired. In these cases, patients are typically rotated into a prone position to facilitate improved blood flow to segments of the lung that were not previously participating in the gas exchange process. However, proning a patient has a significant risk of complications. The low-cost vest presented in this work is designed to be used as a surrogate to patient proning while also requiring less hospital staff to operate than the proning process. The vest was preliminarily tested on 6 patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who experienced ARDS and presumptive V/Q mismatch. The results from this preliminary testing show that 5 out of 6 patients showed a significant increase in ventilation-perfusion similar to the effects of proning.


Aaron Tucker, University of Minnesota

Design and Implementation of a Targeted Cardiocerebral Extracorporeal Oxygenation Membrane SystemAaron Tucker, University of Minnesota

Design and Implementation of a Targeted Cardiocerebral Extracorporeal Oxygenation Membrane System: Outcomes for cardiac arrest (CA) are currently poor, even when CA is experienced in hospital. While the gold standard for treatment is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is most often used to treat cardiac arrest. We propose a fundamental change in ECMO technology to increase access by reducing the amount of highly trained personnel required to perform this treatment. Additionally, we propose a design in which ECMO functionality is combined with functionality of an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) in order to further reduce cardiac workload in cases of cardiac arrest and cardiogenic shock.

 

"Design of a Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Traction and Stabilization Device for Open-Reduction and Internal Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures"
Jake Oeding, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

"Improving Hands-free Speech Rehabilitation in Laryngectomized Patients: Preliminary results of a novel intratracheal fixation device"
Maartje Leemans, The Netherlands Cancer Institute

"Helical Needle Suture Inserter Provides Increased Suture Retention Force Compared to a Straight Needle"
Etse-Oghena Campbell, University of Texas at Austin

"Design of Bio-Exoskeleton for Elbow Rehabilitation"
Pablo Delgado, Wichita State University

"Crisis Ventilator: A 3D Printed Option for Pressure Controlled Ventilation"
Salah James El Haddi, Florida Atlantic University

"Design of a Soft, Self-Uncoiling Stent for Extended Retention OD Drug Delivery in the Small Intestine"
Sunandita Sarker, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

"Novel Endoscope Control Assessment System using Video and Magnetic Tracking"
Saira Hussain, The Pennsylvania State University


Presentation Abstracts:

"Design of a Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Traction and Stabilization Device for Open-Reduction and Internal Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures"
Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is a surgical procedure performed with the objectives of restoring normal alignment and providing stability to broken bone fragments after a fracture. This procedure is increasingly used to treat fractures of the distal end of the radius. Reduction of the fracture into correct alignment is often achieved by the surgeon pulling and manipulating the hand while looking at real-time x-rays, and frequently requires large forces to distract impacted fragments from proximal bone. This can make the task of simultaneously aligning the fracture fragments and placing hardware to secure fragments into the correct position particularly challenging for surgeons. This study presents the design and preliminary testing of a multi-degree-of-freedom (DOF) device capable of performing both distraction and reduction of fractured bone fragments using a traction splint mechanism with locking joints that results in significantly reduced effort and greater accuracy in performing ORIF procedures on distal radius fractures. Quantitative force testing found an 80% reduction in the maximum force required to create needed traction, while qualitative tests with a hand surgeon found the device's ability to reduce and stabilize bone fragments while hardware is secured to be more intuitive and less obstructive than existing techniques.

"Improving Hands-free Speech Rehabilitation in Laryngectomized Patients: Preliminary results of a novel intratracheal fixation device"
Permanent hands-free speech with the use of an automatic speaking valve (ASV) is regarded as the optimal voice rehabilitation after total laryngectomy. Due to fixation problems, regular ASV use in laryngectomized patients is limited. In this paper, we present a novel intratracheal fixation device (ITFD) that might improve stomal attachment of ASVs. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the ITFD in vitro, defined as an effective ASV fixation without causing mucosal tissue traumatization.

"Helical Needle Suture Inserter Provides Increased Suture Retention Force Compared to a Straight Needle"
This paper presents an evaluation of the effect of needle geometry on the strength of a tether made using a barbed suture inserted into phantom tissue using a unique device. This tether is designed to secure an intrauterine device (IUD) to uterine fundus, with the aim of improving retention of IUDs inserted in the immediate postpartum period. A factorial experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of needle geometry on tether strength. Tether strength was characterized by the peak retention force of a suture subjected to a uniaxial tensile load. Experiments were performed using phantom tissue. Two needle geometries and three suture sizes were evaluated. Sutures deposited in phantom tissue with the helical needle had up to 132% increase in retention forces compared to sutures inserted with a straight needle, with more advantage at greater active length. The helical needle provides increased suture retention force and is a suitable tether delivery mechanism for this application.

"Design of Bio-Exoskeleton for Elbow Rehabilitation"
In this study, a methodology for designing a task-based exoskeleton which can recreate the end-effector trajectory of a given limb during a rehabilitation task/movement is presented. The exoskeleton provides an option to replace traditional joint-based exoskeleton joints, which often have alignment issues with the biological joint. The proper fit of the exoskeleton to the user and task are research topics to reduce pain or joint injuries as well as for the execution of the task. The proposed task-based synthesis method was successfully applied to generate the 3D motions of the elbow flexion and extensions using a one degree of freedom (DOF), spatial four-bar mechanism. The elbow joint is analyzed through motion capture system to develop the bio-exoskeleton. The resulted exoskeleton does not need to align with the corresponding limb joint to generate the desired anatomical motion.

"Crisis Ventilator: A 3D Printed Option for Pressure Controlled Ventilation"
The initial stages of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic revealed shortcomings in the ability to rapidly produce ventilators in the event of a sudden increase in the number of patients who require ventilatory support. The CRISIS Ventilator created at Oregon Health and Sciences University is a gas-powered resuscitator designed to be rapidly produced using 3D printers with hobbyist-level printers in addition to industrial manufacturing techniques. The device is low-cost to produce and can be made on-site with a variety of materials. Further, the device functions continuously without electricity and could liberate conventional ventilators for patients with advanced respiratory illness and may function in adult patients with Advanced Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Due to the versatility in production means, small form-factor, and lack of electrical components, the ventilator can be produced and implemented quickly in the event of a surge in ventilator requirements in addition to austere environments.

"Design of a Soft, Self-Uncoiling Stent for Extended Retention OD Drug Delivery in the Small Intestine"
Despite being the preferred route of drug administration, the oral formulation of biological drugs is limited due to its intrinsic instability, low permeability, and physical, chemical, and immunological barriers. Various innovative swallowable technologies such as drug-loaded, dissolvable microneedles, mucoadhesive patches, and various microdevices present unique drug-carrying capabilities. The current work presents a novel soft stent platform that can facilitate contact between the small intestine tissue and drug carriers to enhance drug absorption and increase residence time.

"Novel Endoscope Control Assessment System using Video and Magnetic Tracking"
To improve assessment during endoscope training the novel endoscope control assessment system (ECAS) is developed and tested. This device uses a magnetic tracker to measure position at the end of the endoscope during manikin training. In addition, camera imaging is used to track the angle of the control knobs during the training. Experiments performed demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of this system.


Panel Judges:

Ben Arcand, ArteMedics
Stephanie Board, Boston Scientific Corporation
Paul Campbell, Brown Venture Group
Margaret Hartfel, University of Minnesota
Carol Malnati, Medtronic
Daniel Mooradian, University of Minnesota
Sheila Nichols, Retired 3M Executive
Kelly Stichter, Team Vantage
Mark Wehde, Mayo


Related Sessions:

Emerging Medical Innovation Valuation Competition
Student Design Showcase

Rapid Fire Session 1
Rapid Fire Session 2
Rapid Fire Session 3
Rapid Fire Session 4
Rapid Fire Session 5
Rapid Fire Session 6
Rapid Fire Session 7
Rapid Fire Session 8


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